How To Take The Headache Out Of keeping track of your parent’s medical documents: Episode 067

parent's medical documents

parent’s medical documents

Michael’s mother had a stroke and could no longer care for herself, so Michael became her caregiver.

He discovered the constant need to repeat care giving information to various caregivers so he ended up carrying a binder with him that contained his parent’s medical documents. During this period Michael’s company hired an Elder Family Resource person to help manage the complexities of her care.

James, a longtime friend of Micheal’s, had a similar experience. His father developed sudden onset Parkinson’s after his mother passed away and so couldn’t care for himself. James lived far away, but his sisters lived near his dad. As his dad’s needs increased, it became increasingly difficult to manage the household and care giving information between siblings.

Michael and James talked about their respective care giving challenges and the need for a way to store and share critical documents became obvious. This led to their forming ElderAdmin to fulfill this very important need.

This service stores images of their documents, and you can access it anywhere!  OK…anywhere Internet can be accessed.

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Whether you use their program or not, you’ll need access to documents.  Some of the critical documents that are needed for care giving are:

• Advanced Healthcare Directive
• Power of Attorney
• Will or Trust
• Estate Planning Documents
• List of Medications
• Health Status
• Insurance Documents
• Financial Account Statements

ElderAdmin can help take the headache out of keeping track of your parent’s medical documents:

It is a membership plan that can be accessed via computer, tablet, or smartphone. There is a free service is for individuals.  If you need more than one person to be able to access the info, then you can get that for $9.50 per month (as of 3/2017) for unlimited access and storage.

One of the great features of ElderAdmin is in the area of security. Whoever posts the document has ultimate control over who can and who can’t access particular sections containing information. Encryption with unique IDs and passwords protect your parent’s medical documents.

Today’s Freebie is The Important Documents Checklist, and it can be found at http://RockYourRetirement.com/documents

Website: www.ElderAdmin.com  Phone: 844-350-4582  Email: Contact@ElderAdmin.com

Special Thanks to:

  • Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track
  • Les Briney, my husband, and Danny Ozment of Emerald City Pro who edit the show and makes me and my guests sound terrific
  • Lesinda Tubalado who helps keep the website up to date
  • Henry Shapiro, host of Retired Excited that airs on Fridays
  • YOU the listener for sharing on social media, and telling your friends about it

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

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A little on their backgrounds:

Michael Blevins

Managing Director and Co-founder, Michael Blevins knows from personal experience the need for ElderAdmin’s unique services. Ongoing care for a mom afflicted with dementia led to his knowledge in the ever-changing health care procedures and programs, which makes him especially sensitive to ElderAdmin member needs. With over 32 years’ experience in performance management with nationally recognized financial institutions, including 10 years with a Fortune 500 company, Michael has the qualifications to oversee the operation of ElderAdmin.

Michael attended California State University, San Bernardino, and lives in southern California.

James Hendrick, CSA

Director and Co-founder, James Hendrick was inspired to address one of the most urgent problems facing today’s growing population after his own father’s passing from Parkinson’s Disease: family care giving for aging parents.

With over 20 years of experience in project management and implementation with major world-wide institutions and Fortune 100 companies, James has a solid record of success in technical vision, business solutions and operational strategies. Such diverse, hands-on background was instrumental in the creation and development of ElderAdmin and continues to facilitate its growth and effectiveness.

As a Certified Senior Advisor living in southern California, James has received the education and training to better serve senior clients. Married with three children and three very active grandchild and he understands the challenge of balancing career and family life with senior caregiving.

 

Volunteer for Meals on Wheels in Retirement: RE007

Rosemary Savage says Volunteer for Meals on Wheels in Retirement

Rosemary Savage says Volunteer for Meals on Wheels in Retirement

Today Henry interviewed Rosemary Savage, a retiree who tells us what its like to volunteer for Meals on Wheels in Retirement:

Henry found out that Rosemary and her husband were a regular couple who raised a large family. They looked forward to traveling and also helping others.  Rosemary’s husband Keith passed away, but they had discussed the fact that he wanted to volunteer.  He found that he wanted to volunteer for Meals on Wheels in Retirement.

  • Meals on Wheels is an international organization which involves delivering meals to elderly or incapacitated people in your own
  • community.  Even though Keith is no longer with her, Rosemary continues “meals on wheels” with the help of her daughters, not because she feels obligated, but because she loves it.
  • You can volunteer around your travel plans.
  • Let your basic humanity shine through.  Henry was impressed by Rosemary’s humble nature and her humanity certainly shined through.
  • By being a volunteer for Meals on Wheels you can help your neighbors and give your own life purpose and meaning.

Because Keith and Rosemary planned for their retirement financial, they were able to travel the world.  They drove with a caravan (RV in the USA) to almost every part of Australia and loved it.  They also made lasting friendships along the road.  If you are interested in caravaning (RVing for US based people), listen to the episode on RVing or Read MORE here.

Get Today’s Freebie, Five Steps to Living in an RV (Caravan) full-time, at http://RockYourRetirement.com/RV

To learn more about Meals on Wheels, find your location below and click on the link.

 Special Thanks to:

• Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track
• Les Briney who edits the show and makes my guests and me sound terrific
• Lesinda Tubalado who helps keep the website up to date
• Henry Shapiro, host of Retired Excited that airs on Fridays
• YOU the listener for sharing on social media, and telling your friends about it

What do you say to someone who’s grieving? Episode 66

What do you say to someone who's grieving?

Natalia Volz speaks on Grief

So many people in my life in 2016 were grieving it’s difficult to track them all.

Some of them lost a family member.  Some lost a pet.  And some were grieving over their lost candidate after the election. One of the things that most of us have to deal with in retirement is grief – either our own or someone else’s.  What do you say to someone who’s grieving?  That’s exactly what I asked Natalia Volz and the answer may surprise you.

Natalia Volz is the founder of Passing Through Grief and the RELIEF Process.

She helps individuals who feel lost and down after experiencing a significant loss or change in their life such as a death, divorce, or children leaving home to heal their pain so they can rebuild their life and find renewed purpose.

She has first hand experience with loss and grief.  In 2010, after a two-year battle with cancer, her husband died at the age of 49. Lost, alone, and very frightened, she eventually found her way through the devastating pain of loss and grief.

There is a lack of understanding and a fear in our culture about loss and grief and she found herself struggling to find help to get through. She worked diligently to move beyond her own grief and on to living happily and purposefully.   Natalia read every book she could get my hands on, took courses on the subject, and completed grief recovery certification training, and in the process became passionate about making a difference in the way our society deals with loss, change and grief.

It’s easy to tell that she feels passionate about getting out accurate information on a subject we normally avoid but all have to confront first hand at some point in our lives.

I asked Natalia, “What do you say?”  I know that I’m always at a loss for words when I’m confronted with someone who is grieving, because I know that nothing I say or do is going to bring their wholeness back. She had a very interesting answer:   Be a heart with ears.

For the person who is grieving, she said that time does not heal all wounds.  The person suffering a loss needs to talk about it.  Keeping busy does not heal. So what do you say to someone who’s grieving?

Natalia gave us some steps to take to help with our own grief:

  • Find a place to talk about the feelings of loss.
  • Write about your feelings about the loss.
  • Connect with others.  See if there is one friend who will listen to how you are feeling.  Tell them you just need to talk, and to have them listen.
  • Say it or write it while you are feeling the emotion.
  • Grief causes a lot of energy.  Move through it through your body. Don’t stuff it.  Take a walk if you can.
  • Listen to music that makes you cry. Get your tears out.  Crying releases a stress hormone that actually helps you release the stress.  Don’t worry, you can’t cry forever.  Normally it takes about 15 minutes and then you feel better.
  • Writing really helps with the relief process.

Secrets about Retirement Your Broker won’t tell you. Get your FREE report NOW!

So what do you say to someone who’s grieving?  For dealing with others, remember you can’t fix it so don’t even try.  Be a heart with ears.  If your friend is telling you about some guilt that they might feel, don’t discount it by saying “He knew you loved him”, instead say something like, “I can imagine that would be really painful.  I can’t imagine what that would feel like.  Tell me more”.

Natalia gave us some excellent advice, but unfortunately my internet went out right when we were wrapping up the show.  I hope to have her come back someday because what she had to say was so valuable.  The good news is that we were wrapping up, about to give out her contact information, which we have below.

If you’d like to contact Natalia, you can reach her at 877-606-0909 or Natalia@PassingThroughGrief.com

Her website is http://PassingThroughGrief.com.

Get today’s Freebie, Five Quick Easy Action Steps You Can Do Now To Get Relief From Grief, at www.RockYourRetirement.com/Relief

Special Thanks to:

  • Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track
  • Les Briney who edits the show and makes my guests and me sound terrific
  • Lesinda Tubalado who helps keep the website up to date
  • YOU the listener for letting other people know about this show by sharing on social media, and telling your friends about it

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

Bird Watching in Retirement: RE006

Phillip Jackson is Bird Watching in Retirement

Phillip Jackson is Bird Watching in Retirement

In this episode Henry interviews Philip Jackson about Bird Watching in Retirement. 

Phillip is an avid bird watcher (also known as “twitcher” in Australia).  He planned to pursue that interest when he retired from teaching.

Phillip has actually retired twice.  Henry said he liked it so much he had to do it again.  Listen to the episode to find out how.

Henry talked with him about how he managed his two retirements, how he supplements his income, and why he supplements his income now he has left full time work.

But what Phillip really likes to do is bird watching in retirement.  Henry and Phillip talked about it and they discussed his retirement lifestyle:

Secrets about Retirement Your Broker won’t tell you. Get your FREE report NOW!

  • Anyone can enjoy bird watching.  Novices can enjoy it as much as experienced people.
  • It is truly an activity for all ages, sexes and variety of people.  It doesn’t matter if you are athletic, male or female.  The birds are there for everyone to enjoy.
  • Philip introduced us to the resources he uses to locate specific species, and the cataloging which he enjoys.  Of course cataloging is not mandatory to the hobby.
  • Bird watching is compatible with a great number of other activities which birders often run simultaneously.  For example, camping and photography are the two obvious ones, but some people come to the hobby from simply keeping a couple of pet budgies (parakeets) and developing the interest from there.  Some people start simply by gazing out their window at their bird feeder.

Philip recommended a book for people interested in Australian history, but he couldn’t quite remember the title.  Henry found it:  ‘Lost Relations: Fortunes Of My Family In Australia’s Golden Age’ by Graeme Hewett, published by Allen & Unwin.

Other Books that were mentioned in the interview include:

Special Thanks to:

  • Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track
  • Les Briney who edits the show and makes my guests and me sound terrific
  • Lesinda Tubalado who helps keep the website up to date
  • Henry Shapiro, host of Retired Excited that airs on Fridays
  • YOU the listener for sharing on social media, and telling your friends about it

Becoming a Family Caregiver? You need a Fiduciary! Episode 65

Chris Cooper, Fiduciary

Chris Cooper, Fiduciary

Today’s episode with Chris Cooper was value packed!

If you are currently a family caregiver, or about to become a family caregiver, you need to know about Fiduciaries, and what they do.

A Fiduciary is responsible for the following:

  1. Medical
  2. Psychological
  3. Social
  4. Environmental
  5. Legal
  6. Financial

What you might not realize is that Family Members are also responsible for those same areas.  Many family members don’t realize that they are responsible for all six areas, and tend to only focus on legal and medical issues.

Chris explains that the problems are not necessarily in areas #1 and #5, but are often in the other four areas.  For example, people with Alzheimers often have depth perception issues, something which we don’t normally think about.  Their living space can be an environmental hazard.  (See Episode 34 for tips).

Many of the issues that baby boomers need to think about are alien to us, because we don’t think about these things.  Some of the problems arise when a family member is assigned the task of taking care of mom or dad, and the family doesn’t agree. This is where a Fiduciary comes in.

Fiduciaries are trained to work with all six areas. Unlike family members, they’ve received training.

Children are often not prepared to do all of these things.  We have our own lives to live.  We have our own stresses.  When a family member needs help, we get thrown into the pool, and get our “baptism by fire”.  We don’t often realize that our parent needs to be seen as an adult. We need to let them live their lives in dignity, and then we can live their lives in peace.  Is it right for the children to sacrifice their lives for their aging parents?

Licensed Fiduciaries come from all walks of life.  Its many times “the Third Career”.  Many are in their late fifteens and sixties.  The median age is 58, but many are in their seventies.  Their backgrounds are varied, but they have a common bond.  They want to help protect seniors.

Chris said that sometimes abusers are a family member, but sometimes they are professionals (like financial advisers or caregivers).

Secrets about Retirement Your Broker won’t tell you. Get your FREE report NOW!

Having a Fiduciary can help protect your family member.  Many of these professionals are not trying to harm their clients, but they “don’t know what they don’t know”.  Many are ignorant.  They do not know what is in the best interest of their client now that their client’s capacity has diminished.

  • Where is mom to live?
  • Can you uproot her without harming her?
  • How does the family get along?
  • Is there a neighbor bringing donuts to mom, who is a diabetic?
  • Do you need a guardianship?
  • How can you reduce expense?
  • Do you need an attorney?
  • How can you keep your privacy?
  • Can we take lessons from the past, and plan for our own retirement lifestyle?

Who needs a Fiduciary?

  • Alzheimer’s Patients
  • Disabled Adults and Children
  • Middle Class
  • Wealthy
  • People who need Long Term Care
  • Caregivers who are having issues within their own families due to the stress of caregiving
  • Family members who don’t agree on care options

Public sources might pay for services that a fiduciary recommends.  For example, Medicare might pay for family counseling.    The fiduciary can take a look at what is available under public services such as Veteran’s Benefits, Medicaid or Medi-Cal, or other programs. Mom and dad might even have the money to pay for some things themselves.

Outside Fiduciaries can often help show the financial records, medical records, etc. to keep the family unit strong.  This also can help keep adult protective services, police, and fire departments away.

Everyone is unique, and no two situations are alike.  The good news is that Fiduciaries have training that can help.

Chris Cooper’s Book:  Elder Care Confidential: Cautionary Tales for Adult Caregivers and Caretakers of Parents and Spouses.

To reach Chris, go to:  http://www.chriscooper.com  or 800-352-7674

Get Today’s Freebie, Three Reasons why Your Parents need a Fiduciary, at http://RockYourRetirement.com/Fiduciary

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com