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What to do after Retirement? Episode 109

This might be a hard question for some people who are planning to retire but, let’s face it. What are you going to do after you retire?

 

Steve Cousins is one of our listeners. (Hi Steve!)

He worked for an oil company as an engineer and became the vice president and general manager. He stayed for the same company for his entire career. Steve retired in 2016 when he turned 60, but then he started doing some part-time work, plus he started volunteering.

What did he do before and after he retires?

He always thought he will be working until he was 70 because he was really enjoying in what he’s doing. But a few years before he retired, it all changed.

Steve got bored.

But even though Steve was bored he continued working because he was afraid of retirement. He thought there might not be anything else in him if he left the company.

“You shouldn’t run away from something. You have to run towards something.”

Steve now has gigs such as:

  • Lobbying
  • Expert Witness work
  • Trade Association representation
  • Tons of volunteer work!

It’s not all work for Steve. He also spends time with his wife. They enjoy doing a lot of things together like running, hiking, off-road riding, discovering hidden waterfalls, and many more activities. Now that they are retired, they can spend a lot more time together.

His wife is also smart.  When he was about to retire, she gave him some fantastic advice.

And here is Steve’s advice:

“You should marry someone better than yourself and invest a lot of time in your relationship because if everything else went away and you still have each other, you will still be fine.”

What was the best advice you got in your life?

Leave a comment below and let us know!

This post of Retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

Your hobby can help you in your Retirement: Episode 108

Your hobby can help you in your Retirement

Kim Jamieson-Hirst is a YouTube superstar and a pretty big deal in the quilting world! I brought her on the show to not only talk about her hobby of quilting but how ANY hobby can help you in your retirement. Kim is the owner of Chatterbox Quilts in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. She started quilting more than a decade ago and initially thought it was boring. But after her friends encouraged her to try and enroll in a quilting course, she became addicted and started her business in 2008. Her designs and articles have been featured in Quilter’s Connection magazine, Irish Quilting, The Country Register, and Bustle & Sew ezine.

Kim is the creator of Unloved and Unappreciated: Finding the Hidden Value in Vintage Sewing Machines and is currently working on more online courses to help quilters reclaim their joy in the craft.

If you think quilting isn’t for you or might “boring”, think again! We talked about the various kinds of equipment used as well as the different kinds of quilts there are. It’s quite fascinating! You will also discover during this interview, that I know absolutely nothing about quilting!

We also discussed her YouTube channel called Chatterboxquilts. It teaches her followers how to quilt, how to use machines for quilting, and so much more! She’s also a blogger, and Kim also works part-time at a French immersion elementary school. Busy lady! What started her project is her passion to share her knowledge with other quilters so that they could enjoy their craft more. Just like our previous guest, Ellen Williamson, Kim’s quilting is more of a “jobby”.

Kim goes into greater detail in her freebie, but her tips for reclaiming joy in your hobby are:

  • Join groups that have the same hobby as you!
    • Exchanging ideas and earning more friends that have the same hobby as you will help you a lot.
  • Don’t compare yourself to others.
    • Everyone is unique. You may be good at quilting and not at woodworking.
  • Give yourself permission to stop working on a project.
    • Sometimes, you might feel like you’re not enjoying what you are doing anymore. It’s okay to stop. Time is too short to work on things that you’re no longer enjoying.
  • Don’t feel guilty about the time you spent in working on your hobby.
    • You can’t buy happiness. If you love what you are doing, just keep on doing it! Also, hobbies are good for your mental and emotional health.
  • Stop, but don’t quit!
    • You might feel that you’re not having fun on what you’re doing. Take a break.

If you would like to download, 5 Steps to Reclaiming the Joy in your Hobby, it can be found at http://RockYourRetirement.com/Hobby

Kim’s contact information is: Email: kim@chatterboxquilts.com * Website: www.chatterboxquilts.com

It doesn’t matter whether you enjoy quilting, sports, cars, or even steam trains, it is important to find a hobby (or several) as your hobby can help you in your retirement. What is your hobby? Share it with us in the notes below.

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

Les has cancer and it sucks: Episode 107

Les and Kathe discuss cancerWe are bringing our editor (and my husband) Les, to the forefront of the Rock Your Retirement show to talk about his cancer diagnosis.

Some of you may already know, but In November of 2016 (on election day), we were hit with some devastating news. We were told that Les has stage 4 metastatic prostate cancer. This means he has prostate cancer in about 8 places in his bones. It has a been a journey of sadness, anger, fear, and yes, happiness. We thought we would share a bit of the journey with you.

So the fight begins

We decided Les would go through chemotherapy and hormone blocking. I have to be honest, I was against chemotherapy at first. We also changed our diet and it was very hard!  Les LOVES his cookies and he had to give them up. It has been worth it though because we both feel like the diet change has really helped. Les also did a ton of research and discovered supplements that helped fight cancer. He started taking practically all of them. He’s taking a lot of supplements!

Right now, Les is starving his cancer it and keeping it from getting testosterone which stops it from growing. Over time, the cancer will become resistant to this and that is when the risk is higher. The longer the androgen therapy works, the longer Les lives. If you looked at Les right now, you would not think he was sick. For this type of cancer, the life expectancy is about  3 1/2 years. The way things are going, we both think Les will surpass this.

Everytime Les a new ache, I am not sure if it is because of his cancer or the fact that he is 73!  With the therapy, there are side effects which include:

  • Numbness and swelling in the feet
  • Tiredness
  • Losing muscle mass
  • Gaining weigh in the stomach
  • hot flashes…ladies is this sounding a little familiar?
  • Lack of intimacy. We thought about using tips we learned from Sue Goldstein but we haven’t started that yet

Leading a less stressful life when you are fighting a disease

  • Support of friends and family has been instrumental in relieving stress
  • Mental attitude is important.
  • Doing the things that need to get done. Throw yourself into work or activities to take your mind of things that would cause you stress.
  • Declutter your house because it can be stressful having all that “stuff” around the house. Lisa Woodruff has given us lots of tips on this!
  • Keep your mind busy so you are not focused on how you feel

Now what?

We are going to move forward with our lives and not dwell on his condition.

Still no cookies for Les. We are going to stay away from sugar because we both believe sugar feeds cancer

2018 will be spent making memories together. We are going to spend some quality time together and we are going to be traveling. Our first trip is in March and we are going to Hong Kong, Korea, then China. In August, we are going to Barcelona.

Do you want to come with on either of our trips? We can check into a group rate!  If so, leave a comment below or send me an email through the website.

If you would like to read the blog Les has created about his progress you can go to www.leshascancer.com

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

How Religion helps you stay healthy: Episode 106

Dr. Jim Brown talks about how Religion helps you stay healthyYes! You read that right. Religion helps you stay healthy!

What else should we discuss on Christmas Day, but religion?

Dr. Jim Brown discusses the benefits of going to church with me on this Christmas special, and they aren’t all just spiritual. He is a university professor teaching Technology and Psychology (that’s a weird mix…right?) and is currently the pastor of The Lake Church. Dr. Jim Brown has been a principal, superintendent, department chair at three different universities. He also served several churches and various roles from music pastor to senior pastor.

Did you know that there are benefits in the faith community to our mind, body, and spirit?

Although we still report ourselves to be a “Christian Nation”, 17% of Americans are regularly attending services (including all religions) weekly. That’s about 1 in every 5 Americans go to (church/synagogue/mosque/etc.) on a regular basis. It doesn’t mean that the 83% doesn’t go to church at all, they just don’t go on a regular basis.

Here are some of the benefits of going to church and how religion helps you stay healthy :

  • Churchgoers live longer and enjoy better overall health in the general population.  Why is this?  Does this surprise you?
    • According to Dr. Lynda Powell, Preventive Medicine Specialist at Rush University Medical Center, the answer may lie at least in part in the positive lifestyle choices that churches promote. Most religious organizations discourage negative habits like smoking, drugs, etc.
  • Frequent churchgoers are happier than those who do not attend services.  Of course, there is always the exception, and right now churchgoers might have a particular reputation of being…well…judgmental or “churchie” for lack of a better word…  But according to research on religion, it’s true.  Why is this?
    • We learn (over time) to accept life as it comes.
    • We learn (also over time) to love and accept one another.  No matter what the flaws are.  This can be one of the most difficult things to learn.
    • A support system is built in for those hard times that we all must face.
  • Regular attendance may increase lifespan.
    • Many Americans go to church because it helps them stay grounded and gives them spiritual guidance.
    • Tyler VanderWeele of Harvard said, “Church attendance promotes self-discipline and sense of meaning and purpose.”
    • Dr. Blazer, a professor of Psychiatry at Duke University said, “The one aspect that is significant of good health is religious service attendance.”
  • Couples who attend church services are less likely to divorce and have happier marriages than those who don’t attend.

To get Dr. Brown’s 11 Good Reasons to Attend Church, go to http://rockyourretirement.com/ReasonsToAttendChurch

Do you have any comments about today’s episode?  Post them in the comments section below!

Contact information for Lake Church at Lake San Marcos:

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

How Different Generation Groups Organize: Ep105

Lisa Woodruff on How Different Generation Groups OrganizeLisa Woodruff was a previous guest and I brought her back for a second interview to talk about how different generation groups organize

Lisa is a professional organizer, productivity specialist, and author. She believes organization is not a skill you are born with. It is a skill that is developed over time and changes with each season of life. I am an avid listener and big fan of her podcast show at Organize365.com.

I gave Lisa an update on my personal progress and yes, I am making progress! We also talked about my ” Sunday Basket” and if you listen to Episode 88 which was my first interview with Lisa you can learn more about that.

What are the different Generation Groups? The dates can vary depending on where you look but here is a general idea:

  • The Silent Generation born between 1925 and 1945
  • Baby Boomer Generation born between 1946 and 1964
  • Generation X born between 1965 and 1980
  • Millenials born between 1980 and after

Lisa and I discuss how each generation deals with their “stuff” and what the differences are.

The Silent Generation was born and raised in the Great Depression. They had a lot available to them educationally but not a lot available to them materially. The Silent Generation typically did not have mortgages on their home and did not use credit cards. They were a hard-working and fairly frugal generation. There was not a lot of consumerism while they were growing up.

Baby Boomers were born and raised in the affluence of World War II. This is when consumerism and a lot of toys really came on the market. Barbies, GI Joe, TV’s  and commercials became prevalent and advertisers started targeting teenagers.

Gen Xer’s had all of the toys. They had all of the toys the baby boomers had growing up and then some. The majority of Gen Xers grew up in the 80’s which was the height of materialism. In the 80’s is when things cost the most and people wanted to accumulate a lot of “stuff”.

Decluttering and downsizing

These items that are in our parents and grandparents homes and attics are things that were hard earned. Baby boomers sometimes have a difficult time getting rid of their things because they worked so hard to obtain them. Take the time to go through those things with your parents or grandparents. Let them tell the stories of how the stuff was obtained and the memories that come with them. Find ways of making memories using the stuff.

Lisa has a lot going on! Below is some information on her workshops, podcast, and books

100 day home organization program 

Paper organizing workshop called the Sunday basket. You can learn more about it at thesundaybasket.com

You can also learn more or listen to her podcast at organize365.com

Books/Kindle Editions: 

The Mindset of Organization: Take Back Your House One Phase at a Time

How ADHD Affects Home Organization: Understanding the Role of the 8 Key Executive Functions of the Mind

The Sunday Basket: Weekly Paper Organization & Planning

10 Steps to Organized Paper

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

Taking the Keys Away: Episode 104

Veronica Mitchell on Taking the Keys AwayIn this episode, I talk with Veronica Mitchell about the sensitive topic of taking the keys away.

Veronica is a friend of mine who I have known for awhile. We have served on the same committees at the Caregiver Coalition of San Diego and also the San Diego County Council on Aging. Veronica is an advocate for seniors, women, and caregivers. She is a guest blogger and writes her own blog featured on her website. She is passionate about prevention of Elder Abuse and Scams, along with helping families take the keys from their senior loved ones.

You love your parent or spouse, yet you know that they can no longer safely drive. How do you know that it is time to take the keys away? How do you have that conversation with them in a loving and respectful way? Where do you begin? Families members are afraid to approach the subject. It is our last part of our freedom as we age, and it is very emotional subject.

My father’s Parkinson’s caused his eyes to shut and he was still driving! Obviously, I was panicked and in our family, we had to deal with the tough subject of taking the keys away. Sadly, my story is not uncommon.

Veronica and broke this down into 4 phases:

  • Have Conversations with your loved ones and start it as early as possible. Have a frank conversation and the most candid approach is best. Don’t wait until it is a crisis.
  • Identify, Observe & Document Unsafe Driving. Follow them and observe their driving. Check out the car and see if there are more dents than usual. When you are driving them around ask them directions to get somewhere. Do they get flustered, angry or confused in traffic?
  • Create a Plan, Manage the Plan, and Vet All Participants. Coordinate with friends and family members about who is going to drive them to places. They still need to get to places such as doctors appointments or haircuts. They also need social engagement. Make sure there is a plan to get them to social activities so they don’t become depressed feeling stuck in one place. Make sure to be flexible and have all family members help.

Contact information for Veronica:

Email: veronica@veronicamitchell.com

Twitter: @VeronicaMitch1

Websitewww.veronicamitchell.com

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com