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Documents we need to have a great retirement: Episode 73

Photo of Karin Schumacher Episode 73

I asked Karin to come on the show to talk to us about the documents we need to have a great retirement.

Karin Schumacher has been an attorney since 2001. She is regarded as compassionate, accomplished, and dedicated at Elder Law & Advocacy, Legal Aid Society, and San Diego Volunteer Lawyer Program. She has effectively served over 12,000 clients.

She talks about her grandfather who was a very “well to do” business owner. (He owned 3 auto supply stores). At the time he passed away in 1975, he had over ten million dollars. He wanted his children and his grandchildren to receive that. The problem was that unbeknownst to him, the Corporate Trustee he used, did not have his best interest at heart. All of his hard earned money had been squandered. Now in 1975, there was far less oversight on Corporate Trustees and a lot fewer regulations than there are now.

Put these documents in place BEFORE they are needed. Also update or review them on a regular basis because life events and circumstances change frequently.”

Karin goes over each of these in greater detail during the interview.  Below, is the list of documents we need to have a great retirement:

  1. Advanced Healthcare Directive- This is basically your end of life wishes. It is a 55-page document that goes over your medical wishes should you become incapacitated.
  2. Power of Attorney (Springing or Immediate) Springing POA- Only takes place upon incapacity. Immediate- Be cautious here because the moment you sign an immediate POA, the power goes to the agent. However, a POA is one of the documents we need to have a great retirement.  Kathe likes the Springing kind.
  3. HIPAA Release (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) – Prohibits Healthcare providers from releasing information unless you have completed a HIPAA  release form.
  4. Trust- If you own a home and or assets in California above $150,000 then a Trust will assist in avoiding probate.
  5. Will – If you are distributing assets by other means and don’t own a home, then be sure to create a will.

To get today’s Freebie, What Documents Do I Need Before I Become Incapacitated, go to http://rockyourretirement.com/Incapacitated

Contact Information for Karin: www.AfsarEstatePlanning.com

Special Thanks to:

  • Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track…and helps with these show notes!
  • Les Briney, my husband, and Danny Ozment of Emerald City Pro who edits the show and makes my guests and me sound terrific
  • Henry Shapiro, host of Retired Excited that airs on Fridays
  • YOU for telling your friends about the show, leaving comments below, and sharing episodes you really like on Facebook, and reviewing the show on iTunes

This post about retirement and Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

*Rock your Retirement discusses retirement issues, but neither Rock Your Retirement nor Kathe Kline provides legal advice.  Please be sure to consult your own attorney.

Becoming a Family Caregiver? You need a Fiduciary! Episode 65

Chris Cooper, Fiduciary

Chris Cooper, Fiduciary

Today’s episode with Chris Cooper was value packed!

If you are currently a family caregiver, or about to become a family caregiver, you need to know about Fiduciaries, and what they do.

A Fiduciary is responsible for the following:

  1. Medical
  2. Psychological
  3. Social
  4. Environmental
  5. Legal
  6. Financial

What you might not realize is that Family Members are also responsible for those same areas.  Many family members don’t realize that they are responsible for all six areas, and tend to only focus on legal and medical issues.

Chris explains that the problems are not necessarily in areas #1 and #5, but are often in the other four areas.  For example, people with Alzheimers often have depth perception issues, something which we don’t normally think about.  Their living space can be an environmental hazard.  (See Episode 34 for tips).

Many of the issues that baby boomers need to think about are alien to us, because we don’t think about these things.  Some of the problems arise when a family member is assigned the task of taking care of mom or dad, and the family doesn’t agree. This is where a Fiduciary comes in.

Fiduciaries are trained to work with all six areas. Unlike family members, they’ve received training.

Children are often not prepared to do all of these things.  We have our own lives to live.  We have our own stresses.  When a family member needs help, we get thrown into the pool, and get our “baptism by fire”.  We don’t often realize that our parent needs to be seen as an adult. We need to let them live their lives in dignity, and then we can live their lives in peace.  Is it right for the children to sacrifice their lives for their aging parents?

Licensed Fiduciaries come from all walks of life.  Its many times “the Third Career”.  Many are in their late fifteens and sixties.  The median age is 58, but many are in their seventies.  Their backgrounds are varied, but they have a common bond.  They want to help protect seniors.

Chris said that sometimes abusers are a family member, but sometimes they are professionals (like financial advisers or caregivers).

Having a Fiduciary can help protect your family member.  Many of these professionals are not trying to harm their clients, but they “don’t know what they don’t know”.  Many are ignorant.  They do not know what is in the best interest of their client now that their client’s capacity has diminished.

  • Where is mom to live?
  • Can you uproot her without harming her?
  • How does the family get along?
  • Is there a neighbor bringing donuts to mom, who is a diabetic?
  • Do you need a guardianship?
  • How can you reduce expense?
  • Do you need an attorney?
  • How can you keep your privacy?
  • Can we take lessons from the past, and plan for our own retirement lifestyle?

Who needs a Fiduciary?

  • Alzheimer’s Patients
  • Disabled Adults and Children
  • Middle Class
  • Wealthy
  • People who need Long Term Care
  • Caregivers who are having issues within their own families due to the stress of caregiving
  • Family members who don’t agree on care options

Public sources might pay for services that a fiduciary recommends.  For example, Medicare might pay for family counseling.    The fiduciary can take a look at what is available under public services such as Veteran’s Benefits, Medicaid or Medi-Cal, or other programs. Mom and dad might even have the money to pay for some things themselves.

Outside Fiduciaries can often help show the financial records, medical records, etc. to keep the family unit strong.  This also can help keep adult protective services, police, and fire departments away.

Everyone is unique, and no two situations are alike.  The good news is that Fiduciaries have training that can help.

Chris Cooper’s Book:  Elder Care Confidential: Cautionary Tales for Adult Caregivers and Caretakers of Parents and Spouses.

To reach Chris, go to:  http://www.chriscooper.com  or 800-352-7674

Get Today’s Freebie, Three Reasons why Your Parents need a Fiduciary, at http://RockYourRetirement.com/Fiduciary

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

You, Me and Hospice: The Truth (Episode 64)

Jennifer Marsh, hospice expert

Jennifer Marsh, hospice expert

One of the things that we need to consider in our retirement lifestyle planning is how we are going to deal with illness and dying.  And, when the time comes, hospice care can be an excellent way of preparing ourselves for the inevitable.

I knew that Jennifer was a hospice expert, but I didn’t know that in 2006 she got her Master’s Degree.  She worked with

children at the time and went to school to get her Master’s Degree.  She credits her professor with saving her life when he suggested that she work with hospice.  There are only two schools that offer courses on death and dying in San Diego.

Jennifer Marsh is a community education and outreach specialist for Hospice of the North Coast. She has over ten years of creating, marketing and sustaining thriving educational programs to the general community about serious illness, care-giving and grief and loss issues.

Jennifer has been published in the Touching Lives magazine (2009), and featured on KOCT-TV and Eldercare Talk Radio providing insight and resources to those coping with a serious illness, caring for a loved one and grieving. Jennifer is an expert on hospice and mortality and has been interviewed on the SevenPonds Blog.

She has expertise in creating and implementing community outreach and fundraising events, including Breathe Deep San Diego.

In 2013, she was named as a Finalist for the San Diego Women Who Mean Business Awards through the San Diego Business Journal.

Everyone I know who works in hospice care is a caring person.  That field seems to attract loving and patient people.  Jennifer’s mom had cancer, and even though she had already been working in her chosen field when this happened, she instantly became “the daughter”.  She knows what its like to have a loved one who has been diagnosed with a deadly disease.

There are a lot of misconceptions about hospice and that’s why I asked Jennifer to be on the show.  She shared with us the important truth about hospice:

  • Recommended reading is “Being Mortal“.  You can watch the documentary on Front Line.
  • National Hospice has a FAQ that answers common questions such as:   
    • When is the right time to ask about hospice?
    • How does care begin?
    • Will I be the only hospice patient that the staff serves?
    • Is care available after hours?
    • How does it work to keep the patient comfortable?
    • What role does the volunteer serve?
    • If I reside in a nursing facility or other type of long-term care facility can I elect hospice care?
    • What happens if I cannot stay at home due to my increasing care need and require a different place to stay during my final phase of life?
    • Do state and federal reviewers inspect and evaluate hospices?
    • How can I be sure that quality care is provided?

To get the answers, just go to their website HERE.

Secrets about Retirement Your Broker won’t tell you. Get your FREE report NOW!

  • Choosing a hospice care program does not mean you are giving up hope
  • It is not a PLACE.  It is a type of care

  • Ask your doctor if he or she will continue to work with you.  Many programs have working relationships with their referring doctors
  • Palliative care comes before hospice and you can start that as soon as you have a diagnosis. You don’t give up curative treatment

  • Hospice focuses on Quality of Life, and supports psycho-social, medical, and spiritual needs.  These can include:
  • You can leave hospice if you choose

  • It includes free grief support for a year or longer after the patient’s death

Contact Jennifer at jmarsh@hospicenorthcoast.org or 760-431-4100

Hospice of the North Coast also has an annual fundraising event that you can attend. As of this posting it will be on April 8th.  We hope to see you there!

Get today’s Freebie at http://RockYourRetirement.com/HospiceMyths

Special Thanks to:

  • Angie Strehlow who helps us get great guests that help us with our retirement lifestyle while keeping everything on track
  • Les Briney who edits the show and makes my guests and me sound terrific
  • Lesinda Tubalado who helps keep the website up to date
  • YOU the listener for letting other people know about this show by sharing on social media, and telling your friends about it

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

How to find a Caregiver: Douglas Breuer Episode 60

How to find a caregiver

How to find a caregiver

This Caregiver Agency provides a free venue for people to get to know caregivers

Douglas Breuer started MyCareMatch.com with one objective: Make the process of finding the right care solution less complicated for seniors, people with disabilities and their loved ones.

Douglas’ motivation stems from his direct experience in senior care and case management over the last 10 years.  He started his career in Adult Protective Services. Doug investigated cases where vulnerable adults were being exploited or abused.  He then moved on to act as District Manager for the State of Oregon (“DHS”).  While there, he directed the delivery of long term care services throughout the Central Oregon region. Douglas had the opportunity to work with seniors and adults with disabilities as well as their families.  In his role he coordinated with staff, individual care providers, home care agencies, care communities and countless other service providers to develop care arrangements for seniors and adults with disabilities.

In our interview, Doug explains what MyCareMatch does that is different from home care agencies.  He also talks about why you might want to use it.

Caregivers can build profiles detailing their experience, education, photos, references, resumes and even videos.  If you’ve ever tried to find a caregiver, you’ll probably see how this is helpful.

The organization also can provide extensive background checks with the caregiver’s permission. They also provide reference checks and can even provide DMV checks all at very reasonable prices.

We discussed the Caregiver Registry for the state of California..

Caregivers now go through an intense State screening process. Doug recommends that even if a Caregiver has had a background check a few months ago it is always best to get a more recent one.

The website offers a search tool and educational resources you can explore. If you decide you want to contact a caregiver or care agency, you contact them directly. It is a one to one process.

We also discuss “Ray” who was one of his first clients when working for the state of Oregon. Ray was developmentally disabled.  Ray, who was also a senior, didn’t let his disability stop him.  He lived in the home his parents left him, and some people wanted to take that away from him. Doug would get lots of calls about people trying to take advantage of Ray. He talks about the relationship he built and how he helped intervene to keep him protected, and helped maintain his independence

Find out more at http://www.mycarematch.com

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on RockYourRetirement.com

Military Transitions with Doug Nordman: Episode 59

Military Transitions with Doug Nordman

Military Transitions with Doug Nordman

Doug Nordman is the author of ‘The Military Guide To Financial Independence And Retirement’.

Doug’s writing has to do with Military Transitions.

If you think he’s doing it for the money, you’re wrong.  All of his writing revenue is donated to military charities. He’s a retired submariner who’s been living in Hawaii for over fourteen years. So if you hear the birds in the background, it’s because he is in a tropical area!  He and his wife, (who is a retired Navy Reservist), raised their daughter in the islands.    They enjoy slow travel all over the world (some of it on military Space A flights) and DIY home-improvement projects.  After retirement, he was “bit” by the surfing bug and learned to surf with his family.  Their daughter is now on Navy active duty with her spouse.

Doug gives great advice about military transitions for services members and their families

A few years after retirement, Doug stumbled into writing and became an author. His book provides service members, veterans, and their families information on military transitions into retirement or a new bridge career. Some advice Doug offers in our interview:

  • Prepare 18 months in advance if possible
  • There are a lot of Clubs and Associations for people after they leave the military. The common goal is to assist with military transitions.
  • Both the active service members and their spouse should attend military retirement transition seminars. Doug mentions that there is a lot of written material online.  He thinks that attending a live seminar is best.
  • There are numerous options for military retirees who want to start their own businesses

Being alone together in the same house

I asked Doug about spending so much time with his spouse now that they are both retired. He says he doesn’t get tired of spending too much time together. It is important to have a plan before retirement and talk with our spouse about it. Doug and his wife still have alone time even when they are both home. Learn to adapt to renegotiating roles as things change in your lives. Doug also says it is ok to keep separate interests and priorities.

What advice would you give to a retiree who feels stuck? 

You’ve already worked out the finances, and now you’re “working” on your lifestyle.  Make the time to practice it before you permanently retire.  Take at least 2-3 weeks of vacation to fully unplug from your career. Give plenty of time for contemplation and thoughtful discussions with your family.  Don’t take on huge projects during this time. Instead try to catch up on your sleep, enjoy some long walks, and build a list of activities that you’d like to try.

If you would like a copy of Doug’s Book, The Miliary Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement, go to Amazon or Impact Publications (Which sells a 64-page “Pocket Guide”) You can also find it in the GSA catalog if you are on a military base or check your local public library or military base library

Contact information: nordsnords@gmail.com or you can use the contact me section on his website at http://the-military-guide.com

Get today’s Freebie, 10 tools and tactics for your military transition at http://RockYourRetirement.com/MilitaryTransition

Links to the  people/organizations we mention in the interview

This post on Retirement Lifestyle first appeared on http://RockYourRetirement.com

Making a Move: Episode 57

Jami Shapiro helps you when you are making a move.

Jami helps people who are making a move.

Are you Making a Move soon?  This is the episode to listen to!  Jami Shapiro is the owner of Silver Linings Transitions. She is a single mother of three girls, an 11 year thyroid cancer survivor, a community volunteer and a Realtor.

Believing everything happens for a reason, Jami discovered the National Association of Senior Move Managers in 2014. They were holding the national conference in San Diego.  She attended the conference, met other Senior Move Managers and knew she’d found the work she was meant to do.

Silver Linings Transitions is a bright spot for people facing difficult transitions AND making a move.

The company specializes in seniors who are downsizing or making a move into senior communities as well as couples going through divorce. As someone’s who’s faced cancer and divorce, Jami understands personally how important it is to find the “silver lining” when life doesn’t go the way we’d hoped.  When working with clients through their transition, the Silver Linings Transitions team focuses on what’s positive during a difficult time and helps the client navigate through the move as gently as possible.

The most important work we do is helping people with the emotional aspect of making a move.

In this episode Jamie and I talk about:

  • The secret of getting 3000 square feet worth of stuff into a 1200 square foot apartment.
  • What can I do now if I don’t want to move, but I just have a lot of clutter that I want to get rid of?
  • How do you deal with those boxes and boxes of photos?
  • What is the difference between a mover and a move manager such as Silver Linings Transitions?
  • How to diffuse any needless fighting over belongings and keep the stress level down for everyone.

Be mindful of how much “stuff”  you buy. Spend money on experiences rather than stuff.

Spend more time focusing on the present and what you are able to do. Don’t worry about the future or the past. Focus on what you can do and not what you can’t do. Do something you have never done and always wanted to try.

Contact Information: Phone 858 522-9518Email: info@SilverLiningsTransitions.com * Website: www.SilverLiningsTransitions.com

National Association of Senior Move Managers  https://www.nasmm.org/

Get Today’s Freebie, “10 Steps to get ready for a move” at http://RockYourRetirement.com/ready

This article on Retirement Lifestyle appeared first on http://RockYourRetirement.com